Masonry

/Masonry
Masonry2019-11-08T12:37:55+00:00
Bricks structure
Bricklaying
Concrete placement
Concrete work and stonework
Program Costs

* Program costs subject to change

Industry Credentials

NCCER
OSHA
NOCTI
Simulated Workplace

The Masonry program consists of eight course providing students with entry-level skills in laying brick, block and stone, placement of concrete flatwork and equipment operation training.

Masonry Badge

The Masonry program focuses on careers that will build a knowledge base and technical skills in all aspects of the Masonry industry. Masonry studies the art of bonding several different types of units with mortar for use in building structures, encompassing the tools and techniques of bricklaying, concrete work and stonework.

What are the classes about?

Learn the knowledge and skills of the fundamental principles and techniques to build structures with brick, concrete, hard tile, marble, and related materials.

What skills will students learn?

  • Students learn to build walls, partitions, outdoors fireplaces, and other structures with brick, concrete, and other masonry materials.
  • Learn to use hand tools such as trowels, brick hammers, levels, chisels, and rules. Power saws are often used for cutting and fitting bricks and other masonry materials as specified by blueprints.
  • Learn place concrete flatwork in accordance with A.C.I. (318)
  • Learn operation of excavator, skidsteer, counter-balanced fork lift and rugged terrain fork lift (adults only)

Students will also perform several “hands-on” activities that involve elevation dimensions, layout, squaring techniques, blueprint reading, foundation building, several bricklaying projects, outdoor fireplaces and concrete placement. Academically, students advance through 3-4 books throughout the two years in the Masonry Program. Core, NCCER Masonry Level 1, parts of NCCER Level 2, and Residential Masonry are covered and students test on a weekly or bi-weekly basis.

What Credentials are available?

  • OSHA 10 hour
  • NOCTI Work Competency
  • NCCER Core Safety
  • NCCER level 1 masonry
  • Replace with Bobcat Skid steer, excavator and forklift training (adults)

What jobs/job titles are available to the students after graduation?

  • Bricklayers Union
  • Concrete Finishers Union
  • Laborers Union

Students may also decide to work non-union with their skills or even open their own small business!

What work skills will be needed for these jobs?

  • Mathematical
  • Strong concentration
  • Ability to left 50 pounds
  • Capable of working in varying weather conditions
  • Valid Driver’s License
  • Enjoys working with your hands & physically strong
  • Strong motor skills

What skills should a student have to be successful in your program?

Students interested in the Masonry program at PCTC should have good motor skills, math skills and above all else a WANT TO LEARN attitude. Students will also need to be drug free.

Program Requirements

Students must pass the NCCER Core Safety, the NCCER Level I and obtain the OSHA 10-Hour Construction Safety certification to continue in the program.

For Adult General Admission Requirements, click here.

Simulated Workplace Requirements

This program participates in the Simulated Workplace environment. For details and requirements, click here

Technology Requirements

Students will be provided with any technology instruction, devices and software required.

Student Organization

Students may enroll in SkillsUSA.

Program Length

2 Academic Years (22 months)  – 1080 clock hours (Secondary & Adult part-time enrollment)
1 Academic Year (10 months)  – 1080 clock hours (Adult full-time enrollment)

Consisting of eight (8), nine-week courses of 135 clock hours each

Schedule of Courses

Course Frequency:  Each course offered once each academic year

Secondary & Adult Part-time schedule shown below.

Adult Full-time schedule includes the 1st year schedule in the morning and the 2nd year schedule in the afternoon

1st Year  Schedule:  Monday-Friday 8:30am – 11:00am

1846 Masonry I

1847 Masonry II 

1911 Block and Rock Laying 

1913 Bricklaying

2nd Year  Schedule:  Monday – Friday  12:30pm – 3:00pm

1848 Masonry III

1849 Masonry IV

1917 Foundations and Footings

7629 Career Preparation

Syllabus

Course Descriptions

1846 Masonry I

This course introduces the student to the knowledge base and technical skills of the Masonry industry. Masonry I begins with the NCCER Core curriculum which is a prerequisite to all Level I completions. The students will complete modules in Basic Safety; Introduction to Construction Math; Introduction to Hand Tools; Introduction to Power Tools; Introduction to Construction Drawings; Basic Rigging; Basic Communication Skills; Basic Employability Skills; and Introduction to Materials Handling. Students will then begin developing skill sets related to the fundamentals of Masonry such as Introduction to Masonry; and Masonry Tools and Equipment. Students utilize problem‐solving techniques and participate in hands‐on activities to develop an understanding of course concepts. Teachers should provide each student with real world learning opportunities and instruction. Students are encouraged to become active members of the student organization, WV SkillsUSA. All West Virginia teachers are responsible for classroom instruction that integrates learning skills, technology tools, and skill sets.

1847 Masonry II

Masonry II will continue to build student skill sets in areas such as Measurements, Drawings, and Specifications; Mortar; and Masonry Units and Installation Techniques. Students utilize problem‐solving techniques and participate in hands‐on activities to develop an understanding of course concepts. Teachers should provide each student with real world learning opportunities and instruction. Students are encouraged to become active members of the student organization, WV SkillsUSA. All West Virginia teachers are responsible for classroom instruction that integrates learning skills, technology tools, and skill sets.

1911 Block and Rock Laying

This course introduces the student to the knowledge base and technical skills for concepts in Block Laying. Areas of study include block foundation, concrete block and block leads.  Emphasis will be placed on career exploration, job seeking skills and personal and professional ethics. Safety instruction is integrated into all activities. Students will utilize problem‐solving techniques and participate in laboratory activities to develop an understanding of course concepts, and teachers should provide each student with real world learning opportunities and instruction related to Block Laying.

1913 Bricklaying

This course introduces the student to the knowledge base and technical skills for concepts in Bricklaying. Areas of study include joint finishing, laying brick to the line, constructing brick leads, laying brick positions and brick paving. Emphasis will be placed on career exploration, job seeking skills and personal and professional ethics. Safety instruction is integrated into all activities. Students will utilize problem‐solving techniques and participate in laboratory activities to develop an understanding of course concepts, and teachers should provide each student with real world learning opportunities and instruction related to Bricklaying.

1848 Masonry III

Masonry III will continue to build student skill sets in areas of Residential Plans and Drawing Interpretation; Residential Masonry; Grout and Other Reinforcement; and Metal Work in Masonry. Students utilize problem‐solving techniques and participate in hands‐on activities to develop an understanding of course concepts. Teachers should provide each student with real world learning opportunities and instruction. Students are encouraged to become active members of the student organization, WV SkillsUSA. All West Virginia teachers are responsible for classroom instruction that integrates learning skills, technology tools, and skill sets.

1849 Masonry IV

Masonry IV will continue to build student skill sets in areas of Advanced Laying Techniques; Construction Techniques and Moisture Control; and Construction Inspection and Quality Control. Students utilize problem‐solving techniques and participate in hands‐on activities to develop an understanding of course concepts. Teachers should provide each student with real world learning opportunities and instruction. Students utilize problem‐solving techniques and participate in hands‐on activities to develop an understanding of course concepts. Teachers should provide each student with real world learning opportunities and instruction. Students are encouraged to become active members of the student organization, WV SkillsUSA. All West Virginia teachers are responsible for classroom instruction that integrates learning skills, technology tools, and skill sets.

1917 Foundation and Footings

This course introduces the student to the knowledge base and technical skills for all courses in the masonry Program of Study, specifically foundations and footings. Areas of study include blueprint reading, site layout and footer and foundation installation. Emphasis will be placed  on career exploration, job seeking skills and personal and professional ethics. Safety instruction is integrated into all activities. Students will utilize problem‐solving techniques and participate in laboratory activities to develop an understanding of course concepts, and teachers should provide each student with real world learning opportunities and instruction related to masonry occupations.

7629 Career Preparation

This course introduces the student to theory and technical skill concepts to inspect, use, park, refuel and transport an excavator, skid steer, counter-balanced forklift, and rough terrain forklift. The course consists of classroom theory and techniques and strategies for safe operation during hands-on driving and maneuvering practice instruction. Students must review the equipment manuals for each piece of equipment and pass a written assessment to progress to the hands-on training component. Performance evaluations include: visual and operational equipment checks, basic operating procedures and adherence to general safety guidelines. Students will be provided opportunities to perform several hands-on equipment tasks to gain a basic measurable level of operational competence prior to performing a practical evaluation to determine qualification as an operator.